International Development Law Organization

Tunisia

English

Tunisia enjoys the second-highest human development score in Africa. Since the one-party regime was overthrown in late 2011, the country has embarked on a tortuous transition towards democracy. A new progressive constitution was approved in early 2014, consolidating women's rights and bringing innovations in a number of areas, including open government, state decentralization and sustainable use of natural resources.

Strengthening the Capacities of Women Justice Professionals for Gender-Responsive Justice Delivery and Policy Making

Following the Tunisian revolution of  2011, the new Constitution adopted in 2014 aimed to embed the principle of equality between women and men as well as ensuring the State’s obligation to protect women’s rights. However, despite the reforms to the legal framework in Tunisia to increase protection for women against gender-based violence, justice sector professionals, particularly judges and bailiffs, have limited knowledge, skills and capacity to act as effective gender justice agents, as stipulated by the new Law.

Empowering women to access justice and claim their rights at the local level in Tunisia

Since the revolution in 2011, Tunisia has experienced a period of significant political transition and change culminating in the adoption of a new constitution in 2014, which called for justice reform and protection of women’s rights. However, the practical application of the framework for legal assistance in Tunisia demonstrates the insufficiency of existing relevant mechanisms. Therefore, there is the strong need to empower women to access justice and claim their rights.

Strengthening Institutional Capacity for Investment Agreements in Tunisia

Tunisia has achieved considerable economic progress in recent years despite regional challenges affecting foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Because FDI is so critical to the economic growth necessary to underpin economic growth and stability, Tunisia recognizes the need to attract and retain more FDI, building on the investments already made in the country. With the guidance and support of the Ministry of Development, Investment and International Cooperation (MDICI), Tunisia has engaged with IDLO to strengthen Tunisia's institutional capacity in relation to intern

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Key Initiatives

  • Following the Tunisian revolution of  2011, the new Constitution adopted in 2014 aimed to embed the principle of equality between women and men as well as ensuring the State’s obligation to protect women’s rights. However, despite the reforms to the legal framework in Tunisia to increase protection for women against gender-based violence, justice sector professionals, particularly judges and bailiffs, have limited knowledge, skills and capacity to act as effective gender justice agents, as stipulated by the new Law.
  • Tunisia has achieved considerable economic progress in recent years despite regional challenges affecting foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Because FDI is so critical to the economic growth necessary to underpin economic growth and stability, Tunisia recognizes the need to attract and retain more FDI, building on the investments already made in the country. With the guidance and support of the Ministry of Development, Investment and International Cooperation (MDICI), Tunisia has engaged with IDLO to strengthen Tunisia's institutional capacity in relation to intern
  • Women in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean region, including Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia, are significantly affected by considerable inequalities. Discriminatory legal frameworks and neutral laws enforced with underlying biases and stereotypes continue to hold women in the region back from fully participating in society. Crucially, this is also the case in political and other leadership and decision-making positions. Enhancing the contributions of women judges is particularly important as gender justice remains elusive in many aspects.
  • Tolerance of minorities (religious, sexual or otherwise) remains low in Egypt and other Middle Eastern and North African countries. People living with HIV are among the groups facing most discrimination. The virus is associated with stigmatized behaviors, such as sex between men and drug use. Many people with HIV are thus forced into the shadows, denied treatment, at risk of abuse and imprisonment. IDLO has been working with UNAIDS and local partners to help hundreds of people living with, and affected by, HIV in Egypt to access health and legal services.
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