Indonesia

A lower middle income country for the last seven years, Indonesia has boosted living standards and expanded access to basic services. But incomes have become more polarized; the eastern provinces enjoy much lower access to social services, energy and employment. Natural resources face serious threats. Some 65 million Indonesians remain susceptible to shocks such as illness and loss of livelihood. While democratic gains are undeniable, the quality of governance also needs improving. Decentralization has created a mismatch between national and sub-national laws and regulations; the capacity of the civil service is inconsistent in some areas. Corruption remains a serious problem – as does discrimination against marginalized groups, and low public engagement in policymaking and oversight.

IDLO is working with the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Jakarta to support the development of effective, accountable and inclusive justice sector institutions. This involves strengthening their capacity to work together; enhancing the skills of judicial, legal and paralegal providers; and helping formulate policy and plan legal reform processes. Projects in the pipeline will lay great emphasis on gender issues and human rights, with the paramount aim of better serving vulnerable and marginalized groups and at-risk communities. Natural habitats and resources are another area of interest, as IDLO seeks to create and/or improve legal foundations and practices to manage them sustainable. Finally, IDLO aims to help make Indonesia's business climate more conducive to equitable and sustainable development.

Rule of Law Fund: Programmatic Framework

The Programmatic Framework for the Indonesia-Netherlands Rule of Law Fund builds on the Indonesian Government National Long-Term Development Plan (RPJPN 2005-2025) and continues the efforts of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Jakarta to support the consolidation of the rule of law and reform agenda. The RPJPN’s vision for a “just and democratic” country encourages development that ensures the rule of law is fair, consistent, non-discriminatory, serves the public interest and supports the continuation of democracy.

Capacity Strengthening of the Indonesian Government on Cross-Border Asset Recovery and Mutual Legal Assistance (SIGAP)

Indonesia is facing challenges from embezzlement of stolen assets, which has a negative impact on the country’s political, social, and economic development. Asset-recovery procedures prove to be complex, time-consuming and require expertise and political will. The procedures also require various government bodies to coordinate their actions and engage in resource-intensive processes. To respond to these issues, the Indonesian Attorney General’s Office established an Asset Recovery Centre (Pusat Pemulihan Aset or PPA) dedicated to manage all asset recovery-related issues.

Making Environmental Regulations Work for the People (MERW)

Industrial activities in Indonesia can often have a negative impact on communities living along rivers. Regional governments have difficulties monitoring and acting upon industrial water pollution cases, as clear strategies, guidelines and mechanisms to hold those responsible accountable are often absent. Pollution victims are frequently forced to deal with the issue themselves, and tend to settle for low financial compensations, leaving wider environmental challenges unresolved.

Key Initiatives

  • The Programmatic Framework for the Indonesia-Netherlands Rule of Law Fund builds on the Indonesian Government National Long-Term Development Plan (RPJPN 2005-2025) and continues the efforts of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Jakarta to support the consolidation of the rule of law and reform agenda. The RPJPN’s vision for a “just and democratic” country encourages development that ensures the rule of law is fair, consistent, non-discriminatory, serves the public interest and supports the continuation of democracy.

  • Indonesia is facing challenges from embezzlement of stolen assets, which has a negative impact on the country’s political, social, and economic development. Asset-recovery procedures prove to be complex, time-consuming and require expertise and political will. The procedures also require various government bodies to coordinate their actions and engage in resource-intensive processes. To respond to these issues, the Indonesian Attorney General’s Office established an Asset Recovery Centre (Pusat Pemulihan Aset or PPA) dedicated to manage all asset recovery-related issues.

  • Industrial activities in Indonesia can often have a negative impact on communities living along rivers. Regional governments have difficulties monitoring and acting upon industrial water pollution cases, as clear strategies, guidelines and mechanisms to hold those responsible accountable are often absent. Pollution victims are frequently forced to deal with the issue themselves, and tend to settle for low financial compensations, leaving wider environmental challenges unresolved.

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