International Development Law Organization

Marginalized People

Access to Justice for Juveniles in South Sudan

The rule of law institutions and the justice sector in South Sudan lack adequate infrastructure, financing and skills, and have limited access to legal resources. Consequently, justice actors are unable to provide assistance and perform their mandates in an efficient way in order to address cases of arbitrary arrests as well as unlawful and prolonged detention of juveniles.  In addition, there are no dedicated judges for cases involving juveniles, and civil society organizations, paralegals and law firms providing legal aid operate on ad hoc basis with limited resources.

Supporting the return, reintegration and protection of Somali IDPs and refugees

Somalia constitutes a country of origin, destination, transit, and return for large movements of people across the Horn of Africa. Movement is driven by the intersecting challenges of protracted and persistent conflict, failing systems of governance, and limited employment and livelihood opportunities. More than 2.1 million Somalis live in protracted displacement, with 1.1 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and an additional 1 million Somalis hosted as refugees in countries in the immediate region.

Evaluation of the project Supporting Access to Justice (SAJA) in Afghanistan

As part of IDLO’s continuous commitment to accountability and results-based management, IDLO is pleased to share this Mid-Term Evaluation Brief (summarised evaluation report): “Supporting Access to Justice in Afghanistan (SAJA)”. The evaluation has been conducted by independent evaluation experts, supervised by IDLO’s Evaluation Unit.

Facilitating access to justice

Although South Sudan attained independence from Sudan in 2011, the country has since witnessed violent conflict and military infighting following subsequent political crises. The fragile political situation and ongoing conflict in the country has made it difficult for ordinary citizens to seek and access justice. Almost 90% of disputes are resolved in informal justice systems, and the uneven legal training in both Sudanese Sharia law and English common law have resulted in a weak legal and judicial system that has failed to provide effective legal remedies to South Sudanese citizens.

Key Initiatives

  • The rule of law institutions and the justice sector in South Sudan lack adequate infrastructure, financing and skills, and have limited access to legal resources. Consequently, justice actors are unable to provide assistance and perform their mandates in an efficient way in order to address cases of arbitrary arrests as well as unlawful and prolonged detention of juveniles.  In addition, there are no dedicated judges for cases involving juveniles, and civil society organizations, paralegals and law firms providing legal aid operate on ad hoc basis with limited resources.

  • Somalia constitutes a country of origin, destination, transit, and return for large movements of people across the Horn of Africa. Movement is driven by the intersecting challenges of protracted and persistent conflict, failing systems of governance, and limited employment and livelihood opportunities. More than 2.1 million Somalis live in protracted displacement, with 1.1 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and an additional 1 million Somalis hosted as refugees in countries in the immediate region.

  • As part of IDLO’s continuous commitment to accountability and results-based management, IDLO is pleased to share this Mid-Term Evaluation Brief (summarised evaluation report): “Supporting Access to Justice in Afghanistan (SAJA)”. The evaluation has been conducted by independent evaluation experts, supervised by IDLO’s Evaluation Unit.

  • Although South Sudan attained independence from Sudan in 2011, the country has since witnessed violent conflict and military infighting following subsequent political crises. The fragile political situation and ongoing conflict in the country has made it difficult for ordinary citizens to seek and access justice. Almost 90% of disputes are resolved in informal justice systems, and the uneven legal training in both Sudanese Sharia law and English common law have resulted in a weak legal and judicial system that has failed to provide effective legal remedies to South Sudanese citizens.

Subscribe to RSS - Marginalized People