International Development Law Organization

US State Dept: If IDLO Did Not Exist, We Would Have to Invent It

“I am here to say to you that we need IDLO, and if it did not exist today, we would have to invent it – because it does something that must be done, and [that] so far, no one else in the world is doing.” The statement, by Assistant US Secretary of State for Narcotics and Law Enforcement William Brownfield, came as he opened a congressional briefing on Thursday, April 11th.

South Sudan: Law in a Fragile State

Today (Friday April 19) marks a milestone in IDLO’s involvement in South Sudan, as the final sixteen-strong class graduates from one of the organization’s most transformative courses. With funding from the US State Department through its law enforcement arm (INL), the training has covered both the fundamentals of common law and what is known as ‘legal English’.

Bangladesh: Defending Human Rights in the Face of Disaster

May 9, 2013 - The head of the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) of Bangladesh, Mizanur Rahman, has described the loss of life at the collapsed Rana Plaza textile factory as one of the most tragic incidents in his country’s recent history – but he insisted that any pullout by Western clothes retailers from what is seen as a severely tainted industry would be catastrophic for local workers.

Promoting Intercultural Justice in Peru

IDLO has been working with the European Union’s EUROsociAL program to provide assistance and support to Peru’s indigenous communities. Partnering with the Peruvian Ministry of Justice and judiciary, IDLO has helped create a model for legal orientation and institutional coordination on intercultural justice in the district of San Martín. The intervention sought to strengthen orientation services and legal aid, establishing a model for intercultural justice.

Ecuador: From Subsistence to Market

In order to ease the isolation experienced by some of Ecuador’s indigenous communities, IDLO has designed a legal model for accessing fair trade markets. The pilot phase of the initiative took place in two remote Quechua-speaking mountain settlements, Rumicorral and Ambrosio Lasso. Both communities had extremely low social indicators, with virtually no access to external markets for what was otherwise naturally organic and pesticide-free farming produce.

Equipping Paraguay to Prosecute Trafficking

Paraguay is both a point of origin and transit for human trafficking, especially of women. Children and indigenous groups are also extremely vulnerable. Most of the victims are trafficked to Argentina, Spain and Bolivia. This crime particularly affects populations living in situations of violence, discrimination or poverty. In collaboration with the Paraguayan government and other partners, IDLO has worked on criminal law and justice enforcement in the country, as well as legal protection for victims.

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